Bribie Island – Museum drain & oyster jetty flats – 8 July 2013

Monday

Monday was dry and sunny, with not much wind forecast. I could not get out early but I was determined to fish. I drove up to Bribie Island. As I drove over the bridge I could see the wind rustling in the trees – but at least there were no clouds around.

Monday was the new moon and I had arrived just after high tide at about 9.30 am. This was the smaller high tide of the day. I wanted to survey the area around the Seaside Museum drain and fish the run out tide. The mouth of the tidal lagoon that was emptying near the museum drain, has now almost closed up and a lot of sand has moved around.

I waded out to the south of the drain and cast around. I was using the GULP 4” Minnow soft plastic in the Pearl Watermelon on a 1/8th 1/0 jighead and fishing with 8lb fluorocarbon leader. A Dolphin soon appeared and put on a fairly impressive leaping show. It was a great sight but I doubt it did much for the fishing.

After about 45 minutes with no bites and a steadily building south-westerly wind, I decided to give up on this spot. I stopped for a cup of coffee to consider my options. I then drove back over the bridge to the mainland and parked up. The flats on this side of the Pumicestone Passage are a little more sheltered in a strong south-westerly wind.

I did not have much time left so I waded south, past the old oyster jetty and along the exposed sand spit, towards the green channel marker. I planned to wade back towards the bridge casting along the edge of the weed beds.

The tide was now running out very quickly and lifting big clumps of the ‘snot’ weed off the sea grass. I kept catching them which was really annoying, but even more annoying – my drag on the Stella 2500, was only clicking intermittently. At first, I thought the line might be slipping on the spool but I checked and it wasn’t. The clicker seemed to make a noise if I jerked a bit of line off quickly but not if I pulled it off in a slow, smooth motion.

I started fishing with a Gulp 3” Minnow in the Lime Tiger colour. My first customer was decent Pike who grabbed the plastic after about 20 minutes of casting around. The drag was working but not making any noise. It’s surprising how disconcerting this can be. Although you can feel the fish taking line, the noise that the drag usually produces really helps you gauge where you are in the fight.

After a while I swapped to the Zman range of soft plastics and tied on a Minnowz paddle tail in the Houdini colour. After 20 minutes this had not found the fish so I swapped to a GULP 5” Jerkshad in the Cajun Chicken colour (black and pink). After a few casts, I connected with a fish. I knew it was on but the intermittent drag was confusing me.Almost as a reflex, I reached down to tighten the drag and as I pulled the rod tip up, the 8lb leader snapped.

I re-rigged with the same set up and checked the drag was set right. I cast around in the same spot for about 15 minutes before I had another bite. This time I hooked the fish nicely and left the drag alone. It was a flathead, just under 40cm long. I released it.

It was now about 12.30 pm and we were approaching low tide. It was a bright sunny afternoon but the wind was getting stronger and stronger. I slowly waded back to the car, stopping occasionally to cast at the sandy patches on the weedy bottom. I soon felt another bite, but did not hook up. I stayed in the same place and three casts later, I had another 40cm flathead.

By 1.30pm I was just north of the old oyster jetty. I felt a grab at the soft plastic and suddenly there was an angry, head-shaking flathead coming towards me, across the surface. I wound in quickly and the hook stayed in its mouth. After a minute or two, the fish was beaten. It was the best one of the day, well over 50cm.

I had found a few fish but it had been hard work. I was delighted that the rain had moved on, now we just need the wind to calm down.

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6 responses to “Bribie Island – Museum drain & oyster jetty flats – 8 July 2013

  1. Hello LandAngler,

    Firstly, thanks so much for taking the time out to share your fishing trips with us. I’m going camping to Brooms Head next weeks and came across your blog whilst searching for info on Brooms Head fishing and I must say, reading about your exploits have made me keen to get out there.

    I have a few questions. I haven’t fished plastics off the beach before so I don’t have a rod designed for it and am looking at getting one from BCF. TBH, I hadn’t even considered fishing plastics off the beach and rocks until I came across your blog.

    I’ve read through your posts and note that your heavy rod is a 9 footer (I think).

    Question 1: What size is your lighter rod?
    Question 2: If you had no rods and could only get one as a starting point, do you think it would be better to go with a heavier or lighter rod first?

    There is a 9 foot Shimano combo (4000 Reel) at BCF that I am considering getting if I can convince the Mrs that it’s going to help me catch lots of fish!

    Thanks,

    Paul.

    • Difficult question – my light spin rod is a 6’6″ 1-3 kg which I match with a 2500 size reel, my medium is 8′ which I match with a 4000 size reel, my heavy is 9’6″ which I match with a 6000. I pretty much take them all everywhere, but if i could only take one it would probably be the light spin rod. You can then fish the beach, rocks and estuaries. If you get something big on you may struggle to land it but you will certainly feel the bite! I landed a 55cm Jewfish on my light rod at Bribie yesterday – which was fun!

    • Very nice, if I finish up the week with just one fish (a 55cm Jewfish) I’d be pretty chuffed. 😛

      Thanks for the advice.

      I have some extra light gear (6′ rod with a 1000 reel which I think will be too whippy and a small bait caster) which I was planning on taking as well.

      I’ve caught lots of freshwater fish on them in the 3-4kg range, but my worry is running out of line with such small reels if something bigger get interested.

      I might go back to BCF tomorrow and check out the smaller rod combo’s with larger reels.

      Thanks again. 🙂

  2. Thanks for this blog, I enjoy having a read of your exploits. Its always good to motivate me to get back out for a fish, when Ive been away for work. Keep up the good work!

    Cheers

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