Bribie – the old oyster jetty flats – 26 May 2015

Tuesday 26 05-2015

 

There is not really enough time for fishing at the moment but you have to keep your hand in. I told everybody I had a conference call and bought myself a few hours on Tuesday morning.

It was a cold and I had a little trouble waking up. I did not arrive at Bribie until about 6.45 am.  Low tide would be at 9.45 am and there was a light south-westerly breeze. It was a clear day and the water was cooler again. I waded out under the bridge on the mainland side of the bridge. I started with the GULP Swimmow soft plastic in the Emerald Shine colour on a 1/8th ounce, size  1/0  hook jighead. By the time I reached the jetty I had caught one flathead, but it was too small to keep.

I waded under the jetty and noticed that the tables have been put out in front of the new Sandstone Point Hotel. The old oyster shed is being done up and I have heard it will be a coffee shop – so I will soon have a direct audience, when I am fishing here.

I swapped to a GULP 4” Minnow in the Green Camo colour. I stuck with the 10lb fluorocarbon leader and the 1/8th ounce, size 1/0 hook jighead. I caught another small flathead that was just over 40 cm. The tide was almost all the way out so I walked down to the green channel marker and started to make my way back towards the old oyster jetty. I found the edge of the weed beds and caught three more flathead, only one of which was just over 40 cm.

As I got closer to the jetty I dropped back down to a GULP 3” Minnow in the Sardine colour. This smaller profile soft plastic attracted a few Pike. At about 10.30 am I caught another just legal sized flathead before giving up for the day.

Persistence and changing you bait/ lure offering regularly is the only real strategy when the fish are spread out like this. There are a few fish to be caught but they do not seem to be grouped together for spawning just yet.

Tweed River – The Rockwall – Tailor / Trevally – 14 Jan 2011

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Friday

Living on the north side of Brisbane – meant that I was thankfully completely unaffected by the floods. With the Gateway motorway now open and easy to access, I decided to make a trip down to the Tweed River mouth again.
I arrived to meet a fairly strong east south east wind and a good two metres of swell. I walked out to the end of the north rock wall at about 4.00 am. It was a beautiful dawn sky and as the tide was still running in – the water was not too discoloured.
I started with a GULP 5” Jerkshad in the lime tiger colour and rigged it on a ¾ oz 4/0 jighead. I am now using a ROVEX Aureus 9 Ft rod (the Aureus is just the new name for the old Bario) with the SHIMANO Stradic 6000 reel. I have loaded this with 20lb Fireline and a 40lb fluorocarbon leader.
The wind made it hard to cast but after a couple of attempts, I had the plastic just about where I wanted it – right at the base of the rockwall. As I was about to lift the plastic clear of the water it was slammed and I was onto my first fish of the day. I had no chance with this one. It put its head down and went straight for the rocks and a big wave washed the leader onto the sharp edges and ‘ping’, it was gone.
Another local rock fisherman had a couple of Taylor by now – on a slug – so I switched to a 90g slug for a few casts but then lost it to the rocks. Back to the soft plastic lures. This time I tried the same pattern in a more natural colour – sardine. This did not seem to tempt them, so I switched to the brighter lime tiger again. First cast I got a couple of hits and the tail was bitten off. I threw it out in to the surf again and as soon as it hit the water (minus the tail) it was grabbed. Landing the fish is always a challenge here and it is even worse when the swell is up. With a bit of luck and a fairly tight drag setting, I got the fish safely up the rocks. It was a Tailor just on 50cm.
I put a new soft plastic on and cast it straight back out in the same spot. There were plenty of bites and I thought I had a fish on at one point, but then it either let go or wriggled off. I pulled up the jighead with only ½ a inch of soft plastic left on it. I lost another two or three plastics in this way, over the next 20 minutes.
By now it was about 6.30 am. The tide was running out strongly and the brown slick of the Tweed River was gradually spreading out from the mouth. I put another plastic on, this time on a 1 oz jighead. I cast right out in front of the rock wall and again felt a series of knocks and nudges on the retrieve. I kept pausing but I could net connect with a fish. About fifteen minutes later the line finally came up taught and I had another fish on. I played it round to the ocean side of the rock wall and used a surge to get it safely up to my feet. It was a 40cm Big Eye Trevally. The swell gave me a couple of soakings and I lost a few more plastics, so at around 7.00 am I packed my bags and headed back to Brisbane.
With a cyclone passing out to sea, big swells are forecast for the next few days – the weather is not giving us many breaks this year!